Who is Yahweh?

IS YAHWEH AN ANNUNAKI?
 by
Jan Erik Sigdell
Who is Yahweh?
His name is actually written with only the consonantsYHWH.In the Hebrew writing the vowels are, if at all written, marked with diacritics (additional signs), which isnever or only rarely done with YHWH. The reason may be that according to old tradition his name shouldnot be pronounced. One therefore talks about him in indirect ways, such as Adonay = “the Lord”.For this reason the vowel signs for
 ADNY
are used also for
YHWH
.This would actually lead to Yahowah, but it became Yehowah. Why is that? One reason for the “e” could bethat Yehu is an alternative name for him (and apparently one that may be pronounced).The more proper pronunciation will, however, be Yahweh. Ancient text and inscription discoveries [2]show that the archaic Hebrew religion knew a highest god ’El ’Elyon (the sign ’ is in transliterations usedfor the Hebrew letter ’aleph and ‘ for the letter ‘ayin), who had 70 sons. One of his sons was Yahweh, whohad a consort ’Asherah, i.e., a goddess. Her name is mentioned some 40 times in the Old Testament but it isalmost always translated as “grove” or “tree”.This is because her symbol is a tree or and upright wooden pole. So when the Old Testament states that it isforbidden to plant a tree at the altar of Yahweh it really means that it is forbidden to place a symbol of’Asherah there (Deut 16:21 – and what sense would it otherwise have to forbid planting a tree there?).Has Yahweh even rejected her?
Who is Yahweh?
His name is actually written with only the consonantsYHWH.In the Hebrew writing the vowels are, if at all written, marked with diacritics (additional signs), which isnever or only rarely done with YHWH. The reason may be that according to old tradition his name shouldnot be pronounced. One therefore talks about him in indirect ways, such as Adonay = “the Lord”.For this reason the vowel signs for
 ADNY
are used also for
YHWH
.This would actually lead to Yahowah, but it became Yehowah. Why is that? One reason for the “e” could bethat Yehu is an alternative name for him (and apparently one that may be pronounced).The more proper pronunciation will, however, be Yahweh. Ancient text and inscription discoveries [2]show that the archaic Hebrew religion knew a highest god ’El ’Elyon (the sign ’ is in transliterations usedfor the Hebrew letter ’aleph and ‘ for the letter ‘ayin), who had 70 sons. One of his sons was Yahweh, whohad a consort ’Asherah, i.e., a goddess. Her name is mentioned some 40 times in the Old Testament but it isalmost always translated as “grove” or “tree”.This is because her symbol is a tree or and upright wooden pole. So when the Old Testament states that it isforbidden to plant a tree at the altar of Yahweh it really means that it is forbidden to place a symbol of’Asherah there (Deut 16:21 – and what sense would it otherwise have to forbid planting a tree there?).Has Yahweh even rejected her?

The true creator god, the prime creator, was therefore not Yahweh, but ’El ’Elyon. He has obviously createda number of secondary gods as his “sons” – better: deities – of which Yahweh is one (and, of course, also the“daughter” ’Asherah).Hence, Yahweh is not the prime creator he wants us to believe that he would be, even though he has alsoproduced certain creations. We recognize a noticeable parallel to the Sumerian creation storyEnûma Elish (I here simply use the notation “Sumerian” generally without dividing texts up in a more exact ethnologicalmanner as “Sumerian”, “Acadian”, “Assyrian”, etc.).This tells us about a prime creator pair Apsû and Ti’âmat (who we, in a way, could also regard as the maleand female side of the prime creator, resp.), who created a number of deities, from which further deityraces arose. One such deity race is the one of the Anunnaki (so called because their ruler and leader has thename Anu).They separated themselves off from the 2 prime creators and wanted to live and act without them. EnûmaElish tells about a murder of the highest gods. The Anunnaki are told to have killed first Apsû and thenTi’âmat!Is it possible to kill the prime creators? Of course not!This merely symbolizes that they turned away from them and didn’t want to have anything to do withthem, as if they were dead – that was the fall, the plunge out of the divine light into a relative darkness.Therefore,the Anunnaki are fallen deities. The one who is said to have murdered Ti’âmat is Marduk whoalso became the lord of the Earth.The Anunnaki have under his rule created new human beings on our Earth by means of geneticmanipulation, and from them to-day’s humanity arose.

Correspondences with the Bible
The first sentence in the Bible reads ,in the common translation:
In the beginning
God
created the heaven and the earth”.
(Gen 1:1)
The Hebrew word that is here translated as
God
is ’Elohim.It is a linguistic fact that cannot be denied that this word is a plural and hence means “gods”. It has beentried to explain this away through declaring it as
 pluralis majestatis
 , which actually doesn’t seem to becommon in Hebrew. It rather looks as if one is trying to sweep an embarrassing question under the carpet.In Hebrew, the sentence is Bere’shit bara’ ’Elohim ’et ha shamayim ve-’et ha ’arets. Therefore, some want totranslate it as: “In the beginning the gods created the heaven and the earth”, but this doesn’t fit, since theword bara’ = “create” is in singular. Furthermore, the word for “heaven”, shamay, is also in plural:shamayim. But the problem has a solution.According to cabbalistic sources, the word bere’shit means not only “beginning”, but also “the first one”,the “original one”, the first entity that was, the highest
God
. The little word ’et could be seen as anaccusative particle but can also be translated as “with” (in ve-‘et the word ve means “and”, hence: “andwith”).We now arrive at the following translation, which fits grammatically:
The first one created the gods [together] with the heavens [cosmic worlds] and with theEarth”.
This translation, therefore, refers to a prime creator, who first created “gods” and cosmic worlds, of whichone is the Earth.According to Gen 2, Yahweh is one of these gods, one of the ’Elohim (since the Bible here calls him“Yahweh ’Elohim” in the Hebrew text, and not simply “Yahweh”). Some regard the ’Elohim as creatorgods, who (themselves created) in their turn created other entities –human beings, animals and plants, likeYahweh did.The conventional and “dogmatically approved” translation of bere’shit is based on be = “in, at” and re’shit =“beginning”. However dictionaries (such as [3]) state that re’shit can also mean “the first (of its kind)” and be can be a reference to the “origin”.Therefore the word bere’shit can also be understood as a somewhat tautological expression for “the originalfirst”, “the very first” or “the first of all”. A cabbalistic interpretation is that the word is a combination of beyt = “house, residence” and re’sh = “the supreme, the lord” placed inside beyt (between be and yt).This is then interpreted as “the lord in his residence”.
In a more exact transliteration is bere’shiyt and re’shiyt, resp., and thus one can say “between be and yt”. In-iyt, however, the letter y (actually being a consonant) phonetically marks the prolongation of i andtherefore the more common (but less exact) transliteration is bere’shit. More exactly then with a stroke overthe i that marks the length: ī. There are some more peculiarities in the sentence. If one still wants totranslate as “in … beginning”, it should more literally be “in a beginning” rather than “in the beginning”(because the latter would be bare’shiyt – a contraction of behare’shiyt – and not bere’shiyt).This seems to make little difference, but the word is actually written in an undetermined form as if there could have been more than one beginning (like “in one of the beginnings”). Or it could be a genitive, like“beginning’s” or “of the beginning”. This again makes little difference, but in this case the word “create”would have another grammatical form
[4]
.Such little peculiarities also disappear if we accept the cabbalistic explanation that bere’shiyt actually can be understood as “the first one”.
Plurals in the Bible
First we note that the Bible has two stories of creations of human beings. In Gen 1 it is stated that the gods -the ’Elohim – created humans in their image.Here the plural is obvious:
 , after our likeness… So the gods [properly translated] created man in their own 3 image … male and female they created them”.
(Gen 1:26-27)
This, furthermore, means that the woman was created equivalent to man.They should reproduce diligently. In Gen 2 we come to the second creation of humans. Here we meetYahweh ’Elohim – hence one of the gods named Yahweh – who first created Adam and then Eve. He obviously makes his own creation and he forbids Adam to eat from the “tree of knowledge”.
Advertisements
This entry was posted in Spiritual/Philosophy. Bookmark the permalink.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s